When you are involved as a service provider with children, families, and caregivers affected by FASD, it’s a good idea to examine your own biases and any prejudices you might have. Think about how your experiences impact the children and families you work with. Ask yourself these questions:

  • Have I experienced struggles in school that would help me understand what it’s like for a child affected by FASD who is struggling in school?
  • Have I encountered personal experiences where I’ve been misunderstood, left out, or bullied? How would I react if I didn’t have any friends or people picked on me all the time?
  • How would I feel if I was trying really hard to concentrate and I just couldn’t remember? Would I feel embarrassed or lost? What if people thought I was lazy, rather than had a brain disorder?
  • How would I feel as a parent if people disliked my kids? Would I feel like I was to blame for their behaviour?
  • How would I feel if people blamed me for my child’s disability?  Would I feel ashamed, guilty, and stigmatized? Would I be afraid to talk about my drinking when I was pregnant and parenting? Would I be afraid to talk about my child’s problems because I would be afraid I’d be blamed for them?
  • How would I feel if everyone only saw the negative aspects of my behaviour, not any of the positive things?
  • Do I believe there is hope that a person with FASD and their family can be successful? Am I hopeful that I can  help them?
  • Do I know where to find accurate, research- and evidence-based information about the characteristics of FASD? Do I know where to find accurate, research- and evidence-based information about strategies to support children and families affected by FASD?

If you are able to put yourself in the shoes of a child or family affected by FASD, then you are in a great position to be a wonderful support.